Saturday, September 22, 2018

You Bother Me About a FUCKING STEAK

 



"Don't overcook it. You overcook it, it defeats its own purpose."





"ALRIGHT Alright." !!!






The Cheese Grater

(When I was a Child, we always had a hunk of Pecorino and we grated it on a Box Grater over our Maccheroni, as Robert DeNiro Does here in Martin Scorsese s RAGING BULL  RECIPES .  )
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFgAORdRUf4?feature=player_embedded]


"YOU BOTHER ME ABOUT a FUCKING STEAK" ???

From Martin Scorcsese's RAGING BULL


Starring : ROBERT DeNIRO and JOE PESCI

With : FRANK VINCENT




What are you Doing? I said don't Overcook It."





Cooking the Steak and Fuming Inside






"Don't overcook it. You overcook it, it Defeats its own purpose."






"You want your Steak?"






"It's like a piece of Charcoal."

"BRING IT OVERrrrrr!!"







"You WANT Your STEAK?" !!!





"Yeah! Bring it over."






"HERE'S Your STEAK" !





"Hey Salvi!"

"Go FUCK Youself"




"YOU BOTHER ME About a FUCKING STEAK ?" !!!!!








"You Call those CARROTS?" !!!






"You Ate them, Didn't You?"






"I Got No Choice"I GOT NO CHOICE" !!!!




"Who's an Animal?""Your Mothers an Animal, You SON of a BITCH" !!!!






"I'm gonna get that Dog, and I'm gonna Eat it for Breakfast."

You heat me Larry?"





















SUNDAY SAUCE

RAGING BULL RECIPES


SUNDAY SAUCE is Available on AMAZON.com







Wednesday, September 19, 2018

RONZONI SONO BUONI MACHERONI







RONZONI

MEZZE RIGATONI



.
"Ronzoni Sono Buoni," if you are Italian and grew up in the New York area in the great decades of the 1960's and or 70s you know the slogan. We Italians do love our pasta, we're weened on it! Pasta is the main staple of our diet. Many are fanatical about and love it so, they insist on having it several times a week. I'm one. Pasta, can be covered in a wide variety of sauces,  in some soups like; Pasta Fagoli (Pasta Fazool), in Minestrone's, with Pasta and Peas, and Pasta con Ceci (Chick Peas). Yes, we are weened on it. Mommy gave me, my bothers and sister Pastina coated in a bit of butter and Parmigiano when we were just toddlers  and every so often I have to pick up a box of Ronzoni Pastina, as I love and crave it still, and of late as with many my age, you start craving things you loved as a child, thus my stints with PASTINA ."Ronzoni Sono Buoni," it means, Ronzoni is So Good, and that it is. This brand of  Pasta, born in New York City at the turn of the 20th Century has been a mainstay of not only Italian-Americans of the East Coast but, for all. For years before the surge of many a imported pasta product in the U.S., Ronzoni, was not the only game in town for Macaroni, there was the Prince and Creamette, as well, but Ronzoni dominated the market and though I don't have stats, I would wage to say that 85 to 90 % of all commercial pasta sold in the New York, New Jersey, and Philadelphia areas was Ronzoni, the pasta in the bright blue boxes, Ronzoni Sono Buoni. God I wonder how many plates and bowls of Spaghetti, Ziti and other Ronzoni pastas I ate over the years, starting with Pastina as a toddler  and moving to Spaghetti with Tomato Sauce or Meatballs, Baked Ziti, Stuffed Shells and more. Oh “Stuffed Shells,” they bring back memories of my mother who loved them. We had them often, along with Lasagna made with Ronzoni Lasagana. You don't see Stuffed Shells around that much any more, they used to be on many a restaurant and even more home menus. There popularity has waned, but every once and a while I'll pick up a box of Ronzoni large shells, just for the purpose of bringing back those memories of mom making them and me loving them as  a child. I'll make a batch of tomato sauce, cook the Ronzoni Shells, and stuff them with ricotta and Parmigiano, bake them in tomato sauce, and "Voila" Stuffed Shells of days gone by. I do the same with a Pastina as I still love the dish so, dressed with butter and fresh grated Parmigiano Reggiano, “makes me feel like a kid again!” Yum, delicious little pleasure you can whip up in minutes and bring back visions of your youth. All with some butter, Parmigiano and a box of Ronzoni Pastina. That's Ronzoni, every bit a part of my life and youth as a spring ol Slinky, Etch-A-Sketch, The Three Stooges, Saturday Morning Cartoons, and all the favorites of my youth, Ronzon Sono Buoni, “Ronzoni it's so good!”




Screen Shot 2015-09-20 at 11.24.43 AM




SPAGHETTI
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Screen Shot 2015-06-21 at 12.01.36 PM


SEGRETO ITALIANO

SECRET ITALIAN RECIPES

SALSA SEGRETO

FAMOUS PASTA SAUCE

RECCIPE

Of GINO'S

NEW YORK



.

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Italian Christmas FeastSevenFishes Recipes






luca brasi




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Sonny "  "What the Hell is this?" !!!!


Clemenza :   "It's a Siciian Message ... It means Luca Brasi swims with the Fish"




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SONNY CORLEONE Gets a SICILIAN MESSAGE
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A SICILIAN MESSAGE

"LUCA BRASI SWIMS With The FISH"




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The GODFATHER by SICILIAN-AMERICAN Writeer MARIO PUZO
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Directed by FRANICS FORD COPPOLA
.
Starring :  AL PACINO
.






Learn How to Make The FEAST of 7 FISH
For CHRISTMAS This YEAR !

"EVERYTHING You Ever Wanted to Know About The FEAST of The 7 FISHES  but was AFRAID to Ask"


"ISN'T IT TIME YOU MADE IT" ????







.





Saturday, September 1, 2018

Sunday Sauce Gravy Recipe

 
SIMMERING The GRAVY
 
Or is It SAUCE ???
 
 
 
This is a Great Debate, and there is really No Right or Wrong, either term is correct, it all depends what geographic location that yoru family is from in America or the Old Country of Italia. Whether your family is from Napoli, Sicily, Calabria, or live in New York, Chicago, Boston, or Philly, the most important thing of all is not what you call it, Sauce or Gravy, but how the product taste, it has to be beyond good. 
 
Amother factor that varies, is what you and your family put into your Sauce. The most popular is a Sauce (Gravy) made with Sauasge, Meatballs, and Braciole (Braciola). Some families, like mine love to put Ribs in their Sauce, some put Pig Skin Braciole, some Lamb or Pork Neck, and some families even put chicken into their Gravy, which I myself do every now and then, especially if the local grocerry store has Chicken Thighs on sale. And speaking of sales, we always stock up on Maccheroni (Pasta) and Tomatoes whenever they are on sale as well.
 
For recipes on How to Make SUNDAY SAUCE  alla CLEMENZA from the Francis Ford Coppola  film The Godfather , how to make Dolly Sinatra Meatballs and Spaghetti Sauce, the Bellino Family Sunday Sauce, and Mamma DiMaggio's Sunday Gravy, get a copy of  Daniel Bellino "Z" s SUNDAY SAUCE , When Italian-Americans Cook.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sunday Gravy
 
Another Family Recipe
RECIPES for SUNDAY SAUCE
 
aka GRAVY
 
alla CLEMENZA
 
alla SINATRA
 
alla BELLINO
 
alla DiMAGGIO
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Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Remembering GINO S Lex Avenue

Remembering GINO'S
Dinner at GINO'S
 
Lexington Avenue, New York NY
 
SEGRETO !!!

 

Excerpt of Daniel Bellino-Zwicke 's latest Cookbook, SEGRETO ITALIANO

Secret Recipes & Favorite Italian Dishes, from Broadway Fifth Press

 

 

Segreto? It’s secret in Italian. I got the idea for the book one day. Well not the idea, but inspiration I’d say. I was thinking about one of our all time favorites restaurant, the food, the ambiance and all the fun we’d had there over the years. Many wonderful meals with family and friend, no foes. Dinners with Cousin Joe, Sister Barbara, Brother Michael, and Jimmy. Oh, the food was wonderful, all the great Italian Classics of good old Italian-American Red Sauce Joints of which this one, was one of the best. The classics, like: Baked Clams, Stuffed Artichokes, Spaghetti & Meatballs, Linguine with Clam Sauce, Chicken Parmigiano, Veal Marsal & Milanese, Chicken Cacctiatore, Ossobuco, Cannolis, Spumoni, and-on-and-on. I think you get the picture. Lots of good, affordable Italian Wine, the affable waiter, the phone booth, and the Zebra Wall Paper. If you were a regular their, from the last sentence, you the place I’m talking about. Yes Gino’s! Our beloved Gino’s of Lexington Avenue. Sadly they closed a few years ago. But we still have the memories of so many festive meals. Happy times, good eats.

      I discovered the wonders of Gino’s and first brought my cousin Joe there in 1999. The place was thrilling in that, when you walked in, you felt your were in the perfect place. Gino’s is charged with energy by its wonderful clientele, well-healed regulars who have been going there for years, they know the Maitre’d, the waiters and other customers, and likewise the waiters, bartender, and maitre’d know them. The first time you walk in, you feel that, and want to be a part of it. We did. Back then, Joe and I used to go out to eat together all the time, at least once a week. Joe knew about food, but not to the extent that I did. Joe would come in every week or so, and his driver would drive us around town. He’d pick me up early evening for a night of feasting and good times. We’d often eat at a couple different place. We’d have our main dinner and maybe a little bite to eat when we first went for cocktails to start the night off. As I said, Joe loved eating, and knew quite a bit, but as much as he knew, it wasn’t a third of what I knew about food, wine, and restaurants, and especially the restaurant, bar, and night club scene in New York. I was teaching Joe the ropes, so-to-speak, and Joe was an eager student. We had quite a lot of fun those few years, with dinners at Gino’s, Elio’s (Mondays for Lasagna), Da Silvanos’s, Bar Pitti, The Waverly Inn, Minetta Tavern, cocktails at Pegu and Temple Bar, and way too many other places to name right here. We did New York, we did it all!

   Back to Gino’s. So I had passed by Gino’s any number of times, but never went in to check it out. I was a downtowner, and that’s where we did most of our eating, with an occasional trip midtown or other local if a place peaked our interest. So I did finally walk into Gino’s one day. I had to check it out. When I did, as I’ve already said, I walked in the door and immediately felt the energy of the place. Gino’s was packed, full of life and vibrant, and I knew I wanted to be there. I didn’t eat there right then and there, I was scouting the place out, but I knew I would be back. So I called Joe up and told him all about the place. It sounded great to Joe, this type of place was right up his alley, as it was mine. So Joe said yes, let’s check it out on our next night out.

  Our first ever trip to Gino’s was a few nights later. Joe packed me up at my place in Greenwich Village. I got in the car, as usual, we had a little discussion on what we’d be doing. We mapped out the night of eating and drinking, good times. We talked and decided to head over to Otto Enoteca for a bottle of wine and some Salumi before heading up town to Gino’s and our main dinner of the night. Joe loved Otto, and I was a fan too, so we headed to Otto.

    Well, we went to Otto, drank a little wine, had some Testa, Mortadella, and Prosciutto, and it was on to Gino’s. Back in the car, and Ziggy (our driver) drove us up to Lexington Avenue, across the street from Bloomingdale’s to Gino’s. We were excited as we walked up to the restaurant and through the door. The place was packed and super-charged. We loved it. The Maitre’d greeted us with the first of many warm welcomes. We were In Like Flynn. We sat down at a nice table in the middle of the restaurant. We were happy campers. As happy as can be, for we sensed a wonderful meal ahead. Our hunch would turn out to be just right. A waiter came to our table, greeted us a warm welcome, gave us a wine list and menus, and asked what type of water we wanted. As always, we got a bottle of flat water. Joe gave me the wine list as he usually does and told me to pick something out. I looked over the reasonably priced list and picked out a tried and true wine from my good friend Luigi Cappellini in Greve. The wine, a bottle of Verrazzano Chianti Classico. The waiter went to get the wine, and Joe and I looked over the menu. We were happy to see a great old school Italian menu. The Red Sauce kind of a good old classic Italian-American joint, of which there used to be many, but at this point of time, far fewer. They had; Shrimp Cocktail, Baked Clams, Hot Antipasto, Clams Posillipo, Spaghetti Vongole, Lasagna, Canneloni, Veal Parm, Veal Milanese, Eggplant Parmigiano, Shrimp Fra Diavolo, Veal Marsala, Scampi, and all the usual suspects. We were in heaven, and it was heard narrowing down what to eat.

     One dish really caught our attention, and especially Joe, who although I love my pasta, Joe had has me beat, he’s the pasta freak. Freak in a good way that is. The dish was Pasta Segrete (Pasta w/Secret Sauce), and us intrigued.

    The waiter brought the bottle of Chianti, opened it, and we were on our way. I ripped off a piece of bread and ate it. So, we decided on the menu. We ordered a Shrimp Cocktail and Baked Clams Oreganata to start. We would share these two antipasto items, then move on to the Primi, the pasta course. We decided on, and just had to have the Pasta Segrete, a half order each. We both love Veal Milanese (Frank Sinatra’s favorite), and as we were having antipasto, and pasta, as well as a couple desserts, we decided on one Veal Milanese to split for the main course, thus leaving room for some tasty desserts we knew Gino’s would have. We talked with the our waiter about the menu, and he agreed that we had chosen wisely, and that one Milanese would be fine, so we could eat dessert and he’d help us pick the two best later.

     So we drank wine, and nibble on the bread, chatted and waited in anticipation for the antipasto to arrive. I love Shrimp Cocktail since childhood and don’t always eat it all that much these days, so it’s always a special treat. The Baked Clams and the Shrimp Cocktail came and were a great way to start the meal. The wine was great. Hey it’s Castello Verrazzno!

    So now, we were really excited. This mysterious Pasta Segrete was about to come out. You can get the Secret Sauce with whatever Pasta you like, Spaghetti, Raviolis, Tagiolini, Penne, Gnocchi, or Rigatoni. Joe and I both love Rigatoni, so that’s what we went for, two half portions of Rigatoni Segrete. Well, the waiter brought us our Pasta with Secret Sauce. Guess what! It was outrageous, we loved it. Joe went crazy, and could stop talking about it, and it was just a couple weeks before he’d have to go back and get another “Fix.” Yes the Pasta with the Secret Sauce did not disappoint. We loved it, and would be back for many more bowls.

     We finished the Pasta, grudgingly so, as we didn’t want the experience to end, “It was that good!” We waited a few minutes for the Veal Milanese. It came out, and we could tell just by looking at it, that it would be great. For those of you who might not know, Veall Milanese is one of Italy’s most famous a classic of all dishes. It’s a Veal Chop that’s pounded thin, breaded with breadcrumbs and fried and tipped with a Salad of Arugala and Tomato. The dish is simple, simply delicious when done right. Veal Milanese was one of Frank Siantra’s all-time favorite dish, along with Spaghetti Meatballs, and Clams Posillipo. Frank used to get it often at his favorite of all restaurants, Patsy’s of West 56th Street, just 10 blocks from Gino’s. Both old-school Italian Joints were amongst Frank’s favorites. Patsy’s was Frank’s # 1 favorite, but Gino’s wasn’t far behind, and Ol’ Bue Eyes ate there many times over the years. Anyway, the Veal Milanese was just perfect and we thoroughly enjoyed it. Yes, life is good at times like these.

     We finished our Veal Milanese, and it was now time to think about desserts. I love sweets and so does Joe, so he said we gotta get two. The waiter told us the Tiramisu was “The Best in Town,” and the Cheesecake was really wonderful as well, so we went with his suggestions. Throw in a couple cups of Espresso and some Anisette too, and we were still in heaven.

   Needless to say, our meal was fantastic. We loved it. We loved Gino’s and would be back for more.

 Daniel Bellino-Zwicke

zzzzzzzzzzzzSEGRETitaliano
SEGRETO ITALIANO
SECRET ITALIAN RECIPES
SALSA SEGRETE
and More ..
 

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Sophia Loren Marccello Mastroianni





Marcello and Sophia


YESTERDAY TODAY & TOMORROW



Leri Oggi Domani


I Love the Marcello Barks and Howsl as Sophia does her Strip Tease. Awesome.



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LERI OGGI & DOMANI


Starring SOPHIA LOREN


MARCELLO MASTROIANNI





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MARCELLO BARKING

as SOPHIA Does STRIP TEASE

LOVE IT !!!



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LERI OGGI e DOMANI


YESTERDAY TODAY & TOMORROW

TRAILER


LOREN & MASTOIANNI



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MARCELLO & SOPHIA


The Strip Scene




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SOPHIA LOREN
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Saturday, March 31, 2018

Praise for a Much Loved ITALIAN COOKBOOK

. .  
 
 
 
IF YOU LOVE ITALIAN-AMERICAN or SICILIAN FOOD                                               
  -  YOU MUST BUY THIS BOOK!
 
Review from un SICILIANA-AMERICAN SIGNORA
If you're just beginning to learn Italian cooking - or you're advanced.....you'll find at least ONE recipe in this book you'll have to try. But more likely, you'll find several. What I love about this selection of recipes is that they include strictly Italian; Sicilian; and Italian-American dishes. The author recognizes Italian-American as a cuisine unto its own. Falling into all three categories myself, I have a large collection of Italian and Sicilian cook books, but none specifically for Italian-American. I think this is about as close as I'll get. Dishes from my childhood (along with some charming anecdotes from the author) are in here and my mouth waters just thinking about which one I'll make first.

The recipes are rather simple just like *real* Italian food. I remember the time I asked Zia Elena for her spaghetti sauce and meatball recipes. To me, she was the Queen of authentic and delicious Sicilian/Neopolitan cookery (she married one of those northern Italians, so learned to cook for him. I had to ask her on the sly as no one would admit to her superior culinary skills in front of their own mothers!) Her list of ingredients was short and of course, delicious. Most Italian recipes are like that ---- not complicated, but delicious.

I give this book two paws up! For the price, it's such a deal, it should be in any cook book collection which focuses on the three types of Italian food. And lest the reader say, "But I thought Sicilians *were* Italians..." You can read up on this on the internet and see that Sicily had hosted numerous types of colonies for hundreds of years by everyone from Greeks, Arabs, Byzantines, even Scandinavians!. It only became part of Italy in 1860. Then in 1946 it became an autonomous region. Why does this matter? Sicilian cooking has many influences and so differs, although at times in subtle ways and sometimes in a complete composition expression to the more northern Italian food and customs. Due to Sicily's proximity to Greece, a dear Greek man once told me (as I choked on the sweetness of the baklava he had just given me), that Sicilians were "just Greeks" who wanted to be Italians. May be a grain of truth in that.!
 

If you love this outrageously ethnic food, then I highly recommend this. It's the kind of book I wish Zia Elena would have written and left to me! 
 
Thanks, 
 
Daniel
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SECRET ITALIAN RECIPES
 
SECRET RECIPE CREAMY ITALIAN SALAD DRESSING
 
GINO'S SALSA SEGRET "SECRET PASTA SAUCE"
 
JERSEY SHORE PASTA CRAB SAUCELe CIRQUE'S ORIGINAL Recipe "PASTA PRIMAVERA"
 
The BEST LASAGNA Ever !
 
CLAMS CASINO
 
GRANDMA'S SUNDAY GRAVY
 
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